Continuous Delivery with Maven, Puppet and Tomcat – Video from ApacheCon NA 2013

Apachecon NA 2013A little bit late but finally the video from my session at ApacheCon Portland is available. That was the first version of the talk that I just gave at Agile testing Days which unfortunately was not recorded.

Description
Continuous Integration, with Apache Continuum or Jenkins, can be extended to fully manage deployments and production environments, running in Tomcat for instance, in a full Continuous Delivery cycle using infrastructure-as-code tools like Puppet, allowing to manage multiple servers and their configurations.

Abstract
Puppet is an infrastructure-as-code tool that allows easy and automated provisioning of servers, defining the packages, configuration, services,… in code. Enabling DevOps culture, tools like Puppet help drive Agile development all the way to operations and systems administration, and along with continuous integration tools like Apache Continuum or Jenkins, it is a key piece to accomplish repeatability and continuous delivery, automating the operations side during development, QA or production, and enabling testing of systems configuration.

Traditionally a field for system administrators, Puppet can empower developers, allowing both to collaborate coding the infrastructure needed for their developments, whether it runs in hardware, virtual machines or cloud. Developers and sysadmins can define what JDK version must be installed, application server, version, configuration files, war and jar files,… and easily make changes that propagate across all nodes.

Using Vagrant, a command line automation layer for VirtualBox, they can also spin off virtual machines in their local box, easily from scratch with the same configuration as production servers, do development or testing and tear them down afterwards.

We will show how to install and manage Puppet nodes with JDK, multiple Tomcat instances with installed web applications, database, configuration files and all the supporting services. Including getting up and running with Vagrant and VirtualBox for quickstart and Puppet experiments, as well as setting up automated testing of the Puppet code.

From Dev to DevOps slides from ApacheCON NA Vancouver 2011

ApacheCON NA 2011The slides from my From Dev to DevOps talk at ApacheCON NA 2011 Vancouver. Thanks to all the attendees for coming!

The audio recording seems that it’s going to be uploaded to FeatherCast.

UPDATE: the Lanyrd official page is up too

The code for the Maven-Puppet module is avalable in GitHub, and I’ll write some posts about it in the coming weeks.

The DevOps movement aims to improve communication between developers and operations teams to solve critical issues such as fear of change and risky deployments. But the same way that Agile development would likely fail without continuous integration tools, the DevOps principles need tools to make them real, and provide the automation required to actually be implemented. Most of the so called DevOps tools focus on the operations side, and there should be more than that, the automation must cover the full process, Dev to QA to Ops and be as automated and agile as possible. Tools in each part of the workflow have evolved in their own silos, and with the support of their own target teams. But a true DevOps mentality requires a seamless process from the start of development to the end in production deployments and maintenance, and for a process to be successful there must be tools that take the burden out of humans.

Apache Maven has arguably been the most successful tool for development, project standardization and automation introduced in the last years. On the operations side we have open source tools like Puppet or Chef that are becoming increasingly popular to automate infrastructure maintenance and server provisioning.

In this presentation we will introduce an end-to-end development-to-production process that will take advantage of Maven and Puppet, each of them at their strong points, and open source tools to automate the handover between them, automating continuous build and deployment, continuous delivery, from source code to any number of application servers managed with Puppet, running either in physical hardware or the cloud, handling new continuous integration builds and releases automatically through several stages and environments such as development, QA, and production.

Vancouver harbour panorama

ApacheCON NA Vancouver 2011

ApacheCON NA 2011I’m in Vancouver for ApacheCON NA 2011, where I’ll be speaking on Friday 14:30 about DevOps, From Dev to DevOps, my take on DevOps for people like me interested in DevOps and automation coming from the dev side, and expanding the dev lifecycle all the way to deployment to production. I have previously posted the slides from a another event and will post the updated ones after the talk.

If you are at the conference, come over and say hi!

The DevOps movement aims to improve communication between developers and operations teams to solve critical issues such as fear of change and risky deployments. But the same way that Agile development would likely fail without continuous integration tools, the DevOps principles need tools to make them real, and provide the automation required to actually be implemented. Most of the so called DevOps tools focus on the operations side, and there should be more than that, the automation must cover the full process, Dev to QA to Ops and be as automated and agile as possible. Tools in each part of the workflow have evolved in their own silos, and with the support of their own target teams. But a true DevOps mentality requires a seamless process from the start of development to the end in production deployments and maintenance, and for a process to be successful there must be tools that take the burden out of humans.

Apache Maven has arguably been the most successful tool for development, project standardization and automation introduced in the last years. On the operations side we have open source tools like Puppet or Chef that are becoming increasingly popular to automate infrastructure maintenance and server provisioning.

In this presentation we will introduce an end-to-end development-to-production process that will take advantage of Maven and Puppet, each of them at their strong points, and open source tools to automate the handover between them, automating continuous build and deployment, continuous delivery, from source code to any number of application servers managed with Puppet, running either in physical hardware or the cloud, handling new continuous integration builds and releases automatically through several stages and environments such as development, QA, and production.

ApacheCON US 2009 Oakland

I’ll be next week at ApacheCON in Oakland, celebrating the 10th anniversary of the ASF. Unfortunately I’m not speaking this time, but will be hanging around at the BarCamp Apache (Monday and Tuesday), Hackathon (Monday and Tuesday too), and Maven Meetup (Tuesday night), doing the usual socialization and Face-To-Face meetings. These are all free events that you can attend.

Brett Porter is having a Maven training course on Monday, November 2. You still have time to sign up, and plenty of other Apache folks will be around. Leave a comment or ping me if you want to meet at some point.

BTW there’s an interesting new project proposal in the incubator, the Libcloud project, a client library for interacting with many of the popular cloud server providers. Will try to get more details next week too, but sounds promising.

ApacheCON slides: “Enterprise Build and Test in the Cloud” and “Eclipse IAM, Maven integration for Eclipse”

Here you have the slides from my talks at ApacheCON

Enterprise Build and Test in the Cloud

Building and testing software can be a time and resource consuming task. Cloud computing / on demand services like Amazon EC2 allow a cost-effective way to scale applications, and applied to building and testing software can reduce the time needed to find and correct problems, meaning a reduction also in time and costs. Properly configuring your build tools (Maven, Ant,…), continuous integration servers (Continuum, Cruise Control,…), and testing tools (TestNG, Selenium,…) can allow you to run all the build/testing process in a cloud environment, simulating high load environments, distributing long running tests to reduce their execution time, using different environments for client or server applications,… and in the case of on-demand services like Amazon EC2, pay only for the time you use it.
In this presentation we will introduce a development process and architecture using popular open source tools for the build and test process such as Apache Maven or Ant for building, Apache Continuum as continuous integration server, TestNG and Selenium for testing, and how to configure them to achieve the best results and performance in several typical use cases (long running testing processes, different client platforms,…) by using he Amazon Elastic Computing Cloud EC2, and therefore reducing time and costs compared to other solutions.

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Eclipse IAM, Maven integration for Eclipse

Eclipse IAM (Eclipse Integration for Apache Maven), formerly “Q for Eclipse”, is an Open Source project that integrates Apache Maven and the Eclipse IDE for faster, more agile, and more productive development. The plugin allows you to run Maven from the IDE, import existing Maven projects without intermediate steps, create new projects using Maven archetypes, synchronize dependency management, search artifact repositories for dependencies that are automatically downloaded, view a graph of dependencies and more! Join us to discover how to take advantage of all these features, as well as how they can help you to improve your development process.

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