Speaking Trips on DevOps, Kubernetes, Jenkins

This 2nd half of the year speaking season is starting and you’ll find me speaking about DevOps, Kubernetes, Jenkins,… at

If you organize a conference and would like me to give a talk in 2018 you can find me @csanchez.

Screen Shot 2017-08-24 at 17.07.45.png

Next Events: DevOpsPro Vilnius, MesosCon, Boulder JAM & Docker meetups, Open DevOps Milan

I’ll be traveling in the following weeks, speaking at

DevOpsPro in Vilnius, Lithuania: From Monolith to Docker Distributed Applications (May 26th)

MesosCon North America in Denver, CO: CI and CD at Scale: Scaling Jenkins with Docker and Apache Mesos (June 1st)

Jenkins Area Meetup and Docker Boulder meetup in Boulder, CO: CI and CD at Scale: Scaling Jenkins with Docker and Apache Mesos (June 2nd)

Open DevOps in Milan, Italy: Continuous Delivery and the DevOps Way (June 22nd)

If you are around just ping me!

Downloading artifacts from a Maven repository with Ansible

AnsibleLogoAn example of downloading artifacts from a Maven repository using Ansible, including a prebuilt Docker image.

Prerequisites

Install JDK and Maven using existing Ansible modules

ansible-galaxy install geerlingguy.java
ansible-galaxy install https://github.com/silpion/ansible-maven.git
- hosts: localhost

 roles:
 - { role: ansible-maven }
 - { role: geerlingguy.java }

 vars:
 java_packages:
 - java-1.7.0-openjdk

Example

From mvn.yml, download any number of Maven artifacts optionally from different repositories

- hosts: localhost

 vars:
 mvn_artifacts:
 - id: org.apache.maven:maven-core:2.2.1:jar:sources
 dest: /tmp/test.jar
 # params: -U # update snapshots
 # repos:
 # - http://repo1.maven.apache.org/maven2
 
 tasks:
 - name: copy maven artifacts
 command: mvn {{ item.params | default('') }} org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-dependency-plugin:get -Dartifact={{ item.id }} -Ddest={{ item.dest }} -Dtransitive=false -Pansible-maven -DremoteRepositories={{ item.repos | default(['http://repo1.maven.apache.org/maven2']) | join(",") }}
 with_items: mvn_artifacts

Docker

An image with Ansible, JDK and Maven preinstalled is available at csanchez/ansible-maven.

Scaling Docker with Kubernetes

kubernetesI have published a new article on InfoQ, Scaling Docker with Kubernetes, where I describe the Kubernetes project and how it allows to run Docker containers across multiple hosts.

Kubernetes is an open source project to manage a cluster of Linux containers as a single system, managing and running Docker containers across multiple hosts, offering co-location of containers, service discovery and replication control.

Included in the article there is an example of scaling Jenkins in a master – multiple slaves architecture, where the slaves are running in Kubernetes. When I finally find the time I will implement a Jenkins Kubernetes plugin that would handle the scaling automatically.

Continuous Discussion panel about Agile, Continuous Delivery, DevOps

electriccloudLast week I participated as a panelist in the Continuous Discussions talk hosted by Electric Cloud, and the recording is now available. A bit long but there are some good points in there.

Some excerpts from twitter

@csanchez: “How fast can your tests absorb your debs agility” < and your Ops, and your Infra?

@cobiacomm: @orfjackal says ‘hard to do agile when the customer plan is to release once per year’

@sunandaj17: It’s not just about the tools: is a matter of team policies & conventions) & it relies on more than 1 kind of tool

@eriksencosta: “You can’t outsource Agile”.

@cobiacomm: biggest agile obstacles -> long regression testing cycles, unclear dependencies, and rebuilding the wheel

The panelists:

Andrew Rivers – blog.andrewrivers.co.uk
Carlos Sanchez – @csanchez   |  http://csanchez.org
Chris Haddad – @cobiacomm
Dave Josephsen – @djosephsen
Eriksen Costa – @eriksencosta  |  blog.eriksen.com.br
Esko Luontola – @orfjackal  |  www.orfjackal.net
John Ryding – @strife25  |  blog.johnryding.com
Norm MacLennan – @nromdotcom  |  blog.normmaclennan.com
J. Randall Hunt – @jrhunt  |  blog.ranman.org
Sriram Narayan – @sriramnarayan  |  www.sriramnarayan.com
Sunanda Jayanth – @sunandaj17  |  http://blog.qruizelabs.com/

Hosts: Sam Fell (@samueldfell) and Anders Wallgren (@anders_wallgren) from Electric Cloud.

http://electric-cloud.com/blog/2014/10/c9d9-continuous-discussions-episode-1-recap/

Building Docker images with Puppet

Docker-logoEverybody should be building Docker images! but what if you don’t want to write all those shell scripts, which is basically what the Dockerfile is, a bunch of shell commands in RUN declarations; or if you are already using some Puppet modules to build VMs?

It is easy enough to build a new Docker image from Puppet manifests. For instance I have built this Jenkis slave Docker image, so here are the steps.

The Devops Israel team has built a number of Docker images on CentOS with Puppet preinstalled, so that is a good start.


FROM devopsil/puppet:3.5.1

Otherwise you can just install Puppet in any bare image using the normal installation instructions. Something to have into account is that Docker images are quite simple and may not have some needed packages installed. In this case the centos6 image didn’t have tar installed and some things failed to run. In some CentOS images the centosplus repo needs to be enabled for the installation to succeed.


FROM centos:centos6
RUN rpm --import https://yum.puppetlabs.com/RPM-GPG-KEY-puppetlabs && \
    rpm -ivh http://yum.puppetlabs.com/puppetlabs-release-el-6.noarch.rpm

# Need to enable centosplus for the image libselinux issue
RUN yum install -y yum-utils
RUN yum-config-manager --enable centosplus

RUN yum install -y puppet tar

Once Puppet is installed we can apply any manifest to the server, we just need to put the right files in the right places. If we need extra modules we can copy them from the host, maybe using librarian-puppet to manage them. Note that I’m avoiding to run librarian or any tool in the image, as that would require installing extra packages that may not be needed at runtime.


ADD modules/ /etc/puppet/modules/

The main manifest can go anywhere but the default place is into /etc/puppet/manifests/site.pp. Hiera data default configuration goes into /var/lib/hiera/common.yaml.


ADD site.pp /etc/puppet/manifests/
ADD common.yaml /var/lib/hiera/common.yaml

Then we can just run puppet apply and check that no errors happened


RUN puppet apply /etc/puppet/manifests/site.pp --verbose --detailed-exitcodes || [ $? -eq 2 ]

After that it’s the usual Docker CMD configuration. In this case we call Jenkins slave jar from a shell script that handles some environment variables, with information about the Jenkins master, so it can be overriden at runtime with docker run -e.


ADD cmd.sh /cmd.sh

#ENV JENKINS_USERNAME jenkins
#ENV JENKINS_PASSWORD jenkins
#ENV JENKINS_MASTER http://jenkins:8080

CMD su jenkins-slave -c '/bin/sh /cmd.sh'

The Puppet configuration is simple enough

node 'default' {
  package { 'wget':
    ensure => present
  } ->
  class { '::jenkins::slave': }
}

and Hiera customizations, using a patched Jenkins module for this to work.


# Jenkins slave
jenkins::slave::ensure: stopped
jenkins::slave::enable: false

And that’s all, you can see the full source code at GitHub. If you are into Docker check out this IBM research paper comparing virtual machines (KVM) and Linux containers (Docker) performance.

Using Puppet’s metadata.json in Librarian-Puppet and Blacksmith

I have published new versions of librarian-puppet and puppet-blacksmith gems that handle the new Puppet metadata.json format for module data and dependencies.

Puppet Labs logolibrarian-puppet 1.3.1 and 1.0.8 [changelog] include two important changes. Now there is no need to create a Puppetfile if you have a Modulefile or metadata.json, it will use them by default. Of course you can add a Puppetfile to bring in modules from git, a directory, or github tarballs.

The other change is that all the dependencies’ metadata.json files will be parsed now for transitive dependencies, so it works with the latest Puppet Labs modules and those migrated from the old Modulefile format going forward. That also means that the puppet gem is no longer needed if there are no Modulefile present in your tree of dependencies, which was a source of pain for some users.

The 1.0.x branch is kept updated to run in Ruby 1.8 while 1.1+ requires Ruby 1.9 and uses the Puppet Forge API v3.

Puppet Blacksmith, the gem to automate pushing modules to the Puppet Forge was also updated to use metadata.json besides Modulefile in version 2.2+ [changelog].